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Lining has been very widely practiced, and during the nineteenth century, some painters had their works lined immediately after, or sometimes even before, completion.There have been some doubts concerning its benefits more recently, especially since the Greenwich Comparative Lining Conference of 1974.Without underestimating the efforts of (Dutch) interior painters to make their works seem realistic, it is important to be aware up to what point we are dealing with modified reality.Many mid-seventeenth century Dutch genre paintings, including those of Vermeer, depicted elegant interiors of the upper middle-class.Only in the houses of the very wealthy were floors of this type were occasionally found, although they were usually confined to smaller spaces such as (the entrance or corridor) where they would be most likely to be admired by incoming guests.Fock reasons that the abundant representations of these floors in Dutch genre painting may be explained by the fact that "artists were attracted by the challenge involved in representing the difficult perspective of receding multicolored marble tiling." Vermeer should not be considered a realist painter in the strictest sense of the word.This glossary contains a number of recurrent terms found on the present site which may not be clear to all readers, especially when employed within the context of an art discussion.Some of these terms, signaled by an icon of the Vermeer's monogram and signature, are also discussed as they relate to specifically Vermeer's art.

The term raking light may also be used to describe a strongly angled light represented in illusionist painting, although not strictly between 5º and 30º.

The procedure as carried out in the nineteenth century is described by Theodore Henry Fielding in his (1847).

The picture was removed from the stretcher and laid on a flat surface.

Painters instinctively avoid the lowest angles of raking light because they divided solid objects into to two essentially equal parts: a face would be half in light and half in shadow, which tends to have a flattening effect.

Moreover, raking light create cast shadows that run parallel to the picture plane, so they do not suggest spatial recession as well as shadows that are cast backwards by light originating from a higher angle.

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