A mining company declared a liquidating dividend the journal entry

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Here population nearly doubled in 10 years, and home prices tripled and urban planning circles hailed the boom as the new America at the far exurban fringe.But others saw it as the residential embodiment of the Edward Abbey line that "growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell."Now median home prices have fallen from 0,000 to 0,000, one in eight houses are in some stage of foreclosure and the crime rate has spiked well above the national average, and unemployment hovers around 1%.Build it and they will come, say the developers, confident that growth is always the answer. And most people still do not realize that economic hard times are related to carrying capacity.If we don't stabilize population growth, life as we know it is unlikely to continue.Instead, the free-for-all cities like Las Vegas, the Phoenix metro area, South Florida, this valley - are the most troubled, the suburban slums.Karen Gaia says: Population growth feeds these 'booms'.With so many of us burning fossil fuels, gobbling up renewable resources, and generating toxic trash, our life support ecosystems are threatened.In the central North Pacific Ocean gyre, swirling plastic fragments now outweigh plankton 46 to one.

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We've already added 105 million people since 1970; we have a net gain of one person every 13 seconds.

Daniel O'Neill of the Center for the Advancement of a Steady State Economy says: "t this point in history, having too many people, or too high a level of consumption, is much more likely to result in the end of economic progress, via ecological collapse, than having too few." The costs of economic growth in the U. began to exceed the benefits sometime in the late 1970s.

An economic "slowdown" that results from slowing and eliminating population growth is distinctly different from that caused by a credit crunch or the messy bursting of a speculative bubble.

During the 1800s and 1900s, up to half of world economic growth was likely due to population growth; Georgetown University environmental historian John Mc Neill explains: "A big part of economic growth to date consists of population growth.

More hands, more work, more things produced."Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a measure of economic success or failure, is the number of people multiplied by per capita income.

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